pTrumpet – one year on

Last summer, the folk at Warwick Music kindly sent me a pTrumpet to review. A few months after receiving it, I wrote a post about my first impressions – if you haven’t already read it, check it out by clicking here. Today, after owning the pTrumpet for a year, I’m reviewing the instrument more fully.

 

pTrumpet Optima Design
Credit: Optima Design

The pTrumpet has a funky vibe about it. Coming as it does in a range of different colours, the pTrumpet definitely makes you stand out from the crowd. A fellow 11-year-old trumpeter at my school actually swapped his Lewisham Music Service trumpet for a black pTrumpet which has been much admired by our classmates. Its design is simple and based upon that of a normal trumpet; bell, tuning slide, valves, finger rest and mouthpiece.

During the year I’ve had the pTrumpet, lots of people have tried it.

IMG_9990e
Toddler trumpeter on the pTrumpet

This includes a 2.5-year-old, a 4.5-year-old, my 6-year-old sister and even my parents and their friends! Each time a different person tried it out, their first note blast never sounded the same. What I have learnt from this is that even a toddler has the ability to make a good sound on the pTrumpet – it’s all about the way in which they blow it, not about their age. When I asked the people who tried for their opinion of the pTrumpet, the non brass players tended to comment on how their lips tickled whereas the brass players said it felt weird compared to their own trumpets. The young children loved that they could get a sound out of it (and I loved that I didn’t have to fear for the safety of my B&S trumpet when they wanted to have a go!).

I’ve had my ups and downs with the pTrumpet; there are some days when I don’t enjoy the sound I produce or when I find it frustrating to play. On one occasion, I took the pTrumpet along to a jazz band session and found I couldn’t keep up with everyone else simply because the valves are less responsive than on my B&S. Saying that, there have also been lots of positives…

Camber 2016 (317e)Recently, I went on a family holiday to the beach. There was no way I would have taken my B&S as I would have worried about lots of things including: sand clogging it up, it being an expensive thing to take to the beach and its weight. The pTrumpet was a great alternative; not only could I play it on the sand dunes without worrying about it being damaged, because it’s so light I could also jump off the dunes!

There are more photos of my pTrumpet and me on my Instagram Instagram – please follow me! And here are a couple of (very!) short clips of me playing my B&S and my pTrumpet:

The pTrumpet is designed as an introductory instrument rather than one that needs cash splashed on it. Keeping it in good condition is pretty easy; the valves have springs which avoids the issue of having to oil them, reposition them etc., the plastic body is less prone to being dented and doesn’t need to be polished. These features, and the fact it’s so light, make it the ideal back to school purchase for beginners taking up the trumpet.

P.S. Warwick Music, I’m available next time you need leaping trumpeters…

ptrumpet leaping
Credit: pTrumpet’s Twitter feed

 

 

Advertisements

5 thoughts on “pTrumpet – one year on

  1. Hi dizzytrumpet,

    I’m Christian and the marketing manager for winds instruments of GEWA music. We are the official distributor of the pBuzz, pBone and pTrumpet in Europe. I loved your texts and want to know wether I’m allowed to translate your pTrumpet blog articles to German language and post them on our GEWA blog (blog.gewamusic.com). I want to support your blog and of course I will crosslink your site wherever I can.

    Sincerly, Christian

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Christian, I’m glad you’ve enjoyed reading my blog posts. I’d be very happy for you to translate the pTrumpet and pbuzz posts into German for the GEWA blog – let me know when they’re online!

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s